History Podcasts

Thomas Connally

Thomas Connally


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Thomas Connally, the son of a Confederate Army soldier, was born in McLennan County, Texas, on 19th August, 1877. After graduating from the University of Texas he became a lawyer in Marlin.

A member of the Democratic Party, Connally was elected to the House of Representatives in 1900. At the time he was a progressive who was opposed to monopolies. However, he became disillusioned with politics and resumed his law practice. Connally served as Falls County prosecuting attorney from 1906 to 1910.

In 1916 Connally returned to politics when he was elected to Congress. He joined the House Foreign Affairs Committee and became a strong critic of United States policy in the Caribbean. Connally was also an active opponent of the Ku Klux Klan and defeated a Klansman, Earle B. Mayfield in 1928.

Connally was originally a supporter of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal policies. However, he came under pressure from wealthy oilmen in Texas and he gradually moved to the right. Ross Sterling was elected governor of Texas and he took office on 20th January, 1931. At this time the major oil producers in Texas were concerning about the fall in price of oil. The Texas Railroad Commission, under the control of these companies, attempted to limit the production of oil (prorationing) in the new fields of East Texas. On 31st July, 1931, the federal court in Houston sided with a group of independent oil producers and ruled that the Texas Railroad Commission had no right to impose prorationing.

Large oil companies in Texas such as Humble Oil were in favour of prorationing and Sterling came under great pressure to intervene. On 16th August, 1931, Sterling declared martial law in Rusk, Upshur, Gregg and Smith counties. In his proclamation Sterling declared that the independent oil producers in these counties were "in a state of insurrection" and that the "reckless and illegal exploitation of (oil) must be stopped until such time as the said resources may be properly conserved and developed under the protection of the civil authorities".

Sterling now ordered the commander of the Texas National Guard, Jacob F. Wolters, to "without delay shut down each and every producing crude oil well and/or producing well of natural gas". Wolters who was the chief lobbyist of several major oil companies in Texas, readily agreed to this action. Wolters used more than a thousand troops to make sure that the oil wells in East Texas ceased production. The Texas Railroad Commission was now in firm control of the world's most prolific oil fields. It now controlled the supply of the oil in the United States. As a result, the price of oil began to increase.

Franklin D. Roosevelt attempted to push a bill through Congress that would give his Secretary of the Interior, Harold Ickes, the authority to regulate domestic oil production. However, Sam Rayburn, a politician from Texas, as chairman of the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, was able to kill the bill. It was left to Connally to sponsor the Connally Hot Oil Act. This gave the Texas Railroad Commission the authority to proration oil.

Connally now became one of the leaders of the right-wing opponents to Roosevelt. This including leading the fight against those attempting to pass anti-lynching legislation. The National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People hoped that the election of Roosevelt in 1932 would bring an end to lynching. Two African American campaigners against lynching, Mary McLeod Bethune and Walter Francis White, had been actively involved in helping Roosevelt to obtain victory. The president's wife, Eleanor Roosevelt, had also been a longtime opponent of lynching.

Robert F. Wagner and Edward Costigan agreed to draft a bill that would punish sheriffs who failed to protect their prisoners from lynch mobs. In 1935 attempts were made to persuade Roosevelt to support the Costigan-Wagner bill. However, members of the Democratic Party from the Deep South warned Roosevelt that white voters in the South would never forgive him if he supported the bill.

Connally led the fight against the Costian-Wagner proposals. Although the anti-lynching proposals received a great deal of support from members of Congress, Connally's filibuster tactics were able to stop it becoming law. However, the national debate that took place over the issue helped to bring attention to the crime of lynching.

In December 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt made a speech where he proposed selling munitions to Britain and Canada. Isolationists like Connally and Arthur Vandenberg argued that this legislation would lead to American involvement in the Second World War. In early February 1941 a poll by the George H. Gallup organisation revealed that only 22 percent were unqualifiedly against the President's proposal. It has been argued by Thomas E. Mahl, the author of Desperate Deception: British Covert Operations in the United States, 1939-44 (1998), has argued that the Gallup organization had been infiltrated by the British Security Coordination (BSC).

Michael Wheeler, the author of Lies, Damn Lies, and Statistics: The Manipulation of Public Opinion in America (2007) has pointed out how this could have been done: "Proving that a given poll is rigged is difficult because there are so many subtle ways to fake data... a clever pollster can just as easily favor one candidate or the other by making less conspicuous adjustments, such as allocating the undecided voters as suits his needs, throwing out certain interviews on the grounds that they were non-voters, or manipulating the sequence and context within which the questions are asked... Polls can even be rigged without the pollster knowing it.... Most major polling organizations keep their sampling lists under lock and key."

It has been argued that both Connally and Arthur Vandenberg were targeted by British Security Coordination in order to persuade the Senate to pass the Lend-Lease proposal. Mary S. Lovell, the author of Cast No Shadow (1992) believes that the spy, Elizabeth Thorpe Pack (codename "Cynthia") who was working for the BSC, played an important role in this: "Cynthia's second mission for British Security Coordination was to try and convert the opinions of senators Connally and Vandenberg into, if not support, a less heated opposition to the Lend Lease bill which literally meant the difference between survival and defeat for the British. Other agents of both sexes were given similar missions with other politicians... with Vandenberg she was successful; with Senator Connally, chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, she was not."

On 11th March 1941, Congress passed the Lend Lease Act . The legislation gave President Franklin D. Roosevelt the powers to sell, transfer, exchange, lend equipment to any country to help it defend itself against the Axis powers. A sum of $50 billion was appropriated by Congress for Lend-Lease. The money went to 38 different countries with Britain receiving over $31 billion. Over the next few years the British government repaid $650 million of this sum.

As chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1941-1947) he helped draft the charter of the United Nations. Connally also supported the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Connally upset the Southern Caucus with his support of Harry S. Truman in the 1948 presidential election. Attempts to unseat Truman by supporting Storm Thurmond ended in failure. Connally now came under increasing pressure from right-wing sources in Texas and he eventually decided to resign from the Senate.

Thomas Connally died on 28th October, 1963.


Connally, Thomas Terry (1877&ndash1963)

Tom Connally, United States senator, was born on a farm in McLennan County, Texas, on August 19, 1877, to Jones and Mary Ellen (Terry) Connally. Jones Connally was a Confederate veteran. Tom, the only surviving son of the couple, took a law degree from the University of Texas in 1898 and was elected to the state House of Representatives unopposed in 1900 and 1902. He was a progressive in his opposition to monopolies and to the powerful Senator Joseph Weldon Bailey. Connally declined to run for a third term. He practiced law for several years in Marlin and married a local belle, Louise Clarkson, in 1904. He was Falls County prosecuting attorney from 1906 to 1910 and was in and out of local politics for the next decade, while building up a prosperous law practice and establishing himself in the Methodist Church and several fraternal orders.

In 1916 Connally ran for the vacant Eleventh District seat in the United States Congress, a jurisdiction centered in Waco. After defeating two opponents without a runoff, he was elected and placed on the House Foreign Affairs Committee. He became something of a foreign-policy spokesman for the Democrats in the 1920s, urging the Republican administrators to settle their differences with Mexico and to cease invading Caribbean republics. In 1928 Connally ran against United States Senator Earle B. Mayfield, a Klansman who had been elected during the heyday of the Ku Klux Klan. Connally successfully urged voters to "turn out the bedsheet-and-mask candidate" and in his first term fought President Herbert Hoover's efforts to raise the tariff, levy a national sales tax, and aid business and mortgage holders at the expense of consumers and homeowners.

During Franklin D. Roosevelt's first term as president, Connally was a stalwart New Dealer, seldom differing with the administration. Like any senator he looked after the largest interest groups in his state, writing relief bills for cattle ranchers, cotton farmers, and oilmen. The most far-reaching solutions were devised for the oil industry, which was facing a glut. Prostrate in the early 1930s, the major oil companies and leading independent operators were demanding state and federal aid. The Connally Hot Oil Act of 1935 effectively outlawed the interstate shipment of oil produced in violation of the new state quotas and was fiercely resisted by many independent drillers and processors. Connally first parted significantly from Roosevelt when the senator opposed the president's attempt to change the United States Supreme Court, the court-packing plan of 1937. The measure failed in the Senate. Also in 1937 Connally led the filibuster against the antilynching bill and fought diligently for the southern differential in the wage and hour law.

Connally was a traditional southern internationalist who resisted the isolationist tide and the neutrality acts of the middle and late 1930s. He led the Senate battle for the arms-embargo repeal in 1939 (the Cash and Carry Act) and for the Lend Lease Act of 1941. As chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1941 to 1947, he was one of the handful of Americans who devised the United Nations and its charter. Together with Arthur Vandenburg, he helped to determine bipartisan foreign policy during Harry Truman's administration, including the establishment of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. He served another stretch as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1949 to 1953.

During the war years Connally and his fellow Texas senator, W. Lee O'Daniel, supported the Republican-Southern Democratic coalition more often than any other southern duo. In 1942 Connally led the ten-day filibuster against the repeal of the poll tax. The Smith-Connally Act of 1943 extended the power of the president to seize strike-bound war plants, a measure that Connally believed helped the war effort.

In his years of prominence in the 1930s and 1940s Connally was the best showman in the Senate. A contemporary politician, describing the 200-pound, white-haired Connally, decreed him to be "the only man in the United States Senate who could wear a Roman Toga and not look like a fat man in a nightgown." By the early 1950s, however, Connally had lost some of his effectiveness. Moreover, his notions of party loyalty were distasteful to the powerful tidelands oil lobby. The lobby wanted a strong leader who would support whichever 1952 presidential nominee embraced state ownership of offshore oil lands (see TIDELANDS CONTROVERSY). After they found their candidate in state attorney general M. Price Daniel, Sr., whose speeches effectively linked Connally with the unpopular Truman administration, Connally retired.

Connally and his first wife had one son, Ben C. Connally. Mrs. Connally died in 1935. In 1942 the senator married Lucile (Sanderson) Sheppard, the widow of Senator Morris Sheppard. Connally died on October 28, 1963.


Connally, Thomas Terry. My Name is Tom Connally. New York: Crowell, 1954.

Gulick, Merle L. "Tom Connally as a Founder of the United Nations." Ph.D. dissertation, Georgetown University, 1955.

Matheny, David Leon. "A Comparison of Selected Foreign Policy Speeches of Senator Tom Connally." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oklahoma, 1965.

Patenaude, Lionel V. "Garner, Sumners, and Connally: The Defeat of the Roosevelt Court Bill in 1937." Southwestern Historical Quarterly 74 (July 1970): 36-51.

Schmelzer, Janet. "Tom Connally." In Profiles in Power: Twentieth-Century Texans in Washington, edited by Kenneth E. Hendrickson, Jr., and Michael L. Collins. Arlington Heights, IL: Harlan Davidson, 1993.


Texas Legends #5: Tom Connally

Upon the reelection of Woodrow Wilson in 1916, another Texas Legend was elected, Tom Connally (1877-1963), representing a district centered in Waco. He had gotten his start in state politics, in which he was a staunch foe of the trusts. In the House, Connally specialized in foreign policy as a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and served as a major supporter of Wilsonian internationalism, including the Versailles Treaty. He also was a staunch critic of Republican foreign policy in the 1920s, particularly with the interventions south of the border, including in Haiti and Nicaragua, intended to protect Americans and their property. In 1928, Connally ran for the Senate on an anti-KKK platform, facing in the Democratic primary incumbent Earle B. Mayfield, who was a Klansman. By that year, the influence of the Klan had fallen substantially with scandals, public ill will generated by their violence, and revelations of moral hypocrisy among their leaders. Connally won the primary, and by default the election as Democrats dominated Texas at the time. He proved a foe of President Herbert Hoover’s policies and in 1932 was enthusiastic about the Roosevelt-Garner ticket.

Upon the election of FDR, Connally was mostly on board with the first New Deal, especially on agricultural aid, but he did notably vote against the National Industrial Recovery Act. He also sponsored the Connally Hot Oil Act, which prohibited interstate shipment of oil that violated new state oil quotas. During this time, Connally suffered a personal tragedy as his wife Louise died right in his office of a sudden heart attack in 1935. He would remarry to a woman he had known for many years, Lucille Sanderson Sheppard, widow of Senator Morris Sheppard, in 1942. In 1937, he differed from the Roosevelt Administration in his opposition to the court packing plan as well as his vote against the Fair Labor Standards Act, which many Southern Democrats voted against as it undermined a cheap labor competitive advantage. That year, Connally led a filibuster against the Gavagan-Wagner Anti-Lynching bill, and it was defeated.
Although Connally was having increasing differences with the Roosevelt Administration on domestic policy, he was his key Senate ally in foreign policy, pushing forward the repeal of the arms embargo in 1939, and as chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1941, the Lend-Lease Act. He continued his leading role in defeating civil rights legislation with his filibuster of the bill banning the poll tax for federal elections in 1942. Texas was one of the states that had a poll tax at the time. During the 1940s, his record became even more antagonistic to the Roosevelt Administration on domestic policy, and in the 78th Congress his MC-Index score shot up to 77%. The highest he had scored in the past was a 41%, the session before. Connally was the Senate sponsor of the Smith-Connally Act that session, which permitted the government to seize and operate industries in which strikes provided a threat to the war effort. This law was passed over President Roosevelt’s veto in 1943, but he didn’t hesitate to use it during the Philadelphia transit strike of 1944, when the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Employees Union engaged in a sick-out in protest against the hiring of black motormen as ordered by the Fair Employment Practices Committee.

Connally holds a watch to mark the time of the declaration of war against Japan.

In 1945, Connally played a key role in the drafting of the United Nations Charter and was the second American to sign it. He also incorporated in the United Nations bill the “Connally Amendment”, which prevented UN jurisdiction in internal matters in the United States. This helped win it overwhelming ratification in the Senate. Although Connally was easily reelected in 1946, he faced a Republican Congress. He again proved a staunch ally of Truman on foreign policy and was widely seen as his Senate spokesman. Connally worked closely with Senator Arthur Vandenberg (R-Mich.) to pass the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan in a Congress that was diametrically opposed to the president on domestic policy. This didn’t mean Connally always agreed with Truman: after he picked General Mark Clark, a man who wasn’t Catholic, for emissary to the Holy See, Connally and others protested and Clark withdrew his nomination. Consistent with his antagonistic record on organized labor, Connally voted for the Taft-Hartley Act, which passed over President Truman’s veto. However, on other significant domestic issues he often sided with Truman, including on unemployment compensation, anti-trust policy, public power, and the excess profits tax.

In 1949, Democrats regained Congress and Connally was once again chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Lyndon B. Johnson joined him in the Senate that year as well but he ran afoul of him when he was overly ambitious in the committees he wanted. However, it wouldn’t be long for Johnson to supersede Connally in influence: the latter’s greater loyalty to Truman than for third term Roosevelt proved politically damaging in Texas, as he had become deeply unpopular in the state as well as in the nation. The Korean War had dragged out into a stalemate, extensive corruption had been revealed in his administration, and Texas voters had some special beefs with President Truman. These included his policy of pushing federal title to the tidelands and his proposed civil rights program. Texas Attorney General Price Daniel, who had directly battled the Truman Administration on tidelands policy in court, had announced his candidacy. Although Connally too supported state title over the tidelands and opposed civil rights legislation, he saw the writing on the wall and chose to retire in 1952 rather than face a tough primary or even defeat. That year Republican Dwight Eisenhower, who had pledged to return tidelands to state title, and Daniel won their elections. Connally died of pneumonia on October 28, 1963. His lifetime MC-Index score was a 27%.

Green, G.N. Connally, Thomas Terry (1877-1963). Texas State Historical Association.

Hill, R. (2012, November 11). Tom Connally of Texas. The Knoxville Focus.


Thomas Connelly

Source: http://www.geocities.com/jjccorn/Index/Page1.html#4 In his book "The Founding of Harman's Station," author and noted historian William Elsey Connelley says that according to family tradition there were some Connellys, probably Thomas and his brother Harmon, in an exploration party in Eastern Kentucky about 1763 in search for a suitable place to live. Also in this party were Daniel Boone, Matthias Harman, Walter Mankins, James Skaggs, Henry Skaggs, and a number of others. They camped along the Louisa River, at the mouth of Big Paint Creek, for six weeks in some old decaying cabins that the Ohio Indians had said they and the French had built many years before. The river and creek bottoms were covered with cane that was so high it would hide a man on horseback. Sometimes the river was so full of buffalo wallowing in the shoals that it was impossible to get a canoe either up or downstream. The Indians were so fierce in the area that it was impossible for anyone from the party to locate there at that time. Thomas was in the First South Carolina Regiment under the direction of Colonel Charles Pinckney during the Revolutionary War. He served in the winter of 1779-1780 in the defense of Charleston, which is where he had gone to consult Colonel Pinckney, who was his attorney in some business growing out of some land that was owned around that city by Thomas' ancestors. He was wounded during the Battle of King's Mountain on October 7, 1780, when he was about 55 years old. During the battle Thomas was shot by a musket ball that went completely through him. He was treated by a Dr. Hicks, who was either the father-in-law or the nephew of Thomas' brother Harmon. To treat the wound, Dr. Hicks passed a silk handkerchief through it - completely through Thomas' body - several times. Thomas died in 1783 as a result of this wound.

From the book "Three Hundred Years In America With The Connely Clan" by Reginald Dowaine Conley: "Thomas, who was born in Guilford County, North Carolina used to travel up North with his father, Edmund trading and then back to the Carolinas. He undoubtedly learned the trading business this way at an early age. And he was to meet his wife in Chester County, Pennsylvania where he resided for some time. He married Mary Van Harlingen about 1747. She was a Dutch woman whose ancestors lived in Holland. The Dutch influence was to have a strong impression upon their children. Their children and approximate year of birth are: John - 1749, Henry - 2 May 1751 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania (later to be known as Captain Henry Connelly), Thomas, Jr. - 1754, Elizabeth - 1757, Rachel - 1760, James - 1765, William - 1768.

"Thomas Connelly while in Pennsylvania fought under British General Braddock and young Lieutenant George Washington in their campaign against the French during the French-Indian War in Pennsylvania. At the time of the Revolutionary War Thomas was living in Guilford County, North Carolina (1775-83). In 1780 the British army was trying to capture Charleston, South Carolina. Thomas was on his way to Charleston to see his lawyer concerning some land that he owned in Charleston. When he arrived in the city he learned that the British were near and marching on the city. Although he was getting old he was inducted into the American Army which was commanded by General Lincoln. He served under Colonel Charles Cotesworth Pinckney in the First South Carolina Regiment. The British captured the city 12 May 1780. During the confusion Thomas escaped and later fought at the battle of King's Mountain on 7 October 1780. The battle of King's Mountain was an overwhelming victory for the Americans. The entire British force was killed or captured. During the battle Thomas was shot through the body by a British musket ball. A Doctor Hicks, who was half Indian and had graduated from a French University treated the wound by passing a silk hankerchief through it. About three years later in 1783 Thomas died from the wounds. Some family historians feel that he died and was buried in Christensburg, Montgomery County, Virginia. He owned land and property in Charleston, South Carolina, Guilford County, North Carolina and Montgomery County, Virginia at the time of his death. The name was being recorded in North Carolina and Virginia at this time on legal documents as Connelly, Connely, Conley, Conneley, Connoley and Coneley.

"William Elsey Connelley suggested and felt that the early Connelley brothers from Northern Ireland were of the Roman Catholic Religion. The author is not of this opinion. At the time the four Connelley brothers left Armagh there was a great deal of political and religious unrest. The First Presbyterian Church of Armagh was established in 1673. They came to a predominately protestant colony when arriving in the Charlston, South Carolina area. William of Orange married his cousin Mary in 1677. She was the daughter of James, Duke of York, later King James II of England. James was Roman Catholic. However William and Mary were both protestant. William and Mary became rulers of England in 1689 after forcing James to leave. He escaped to France. In 1690, William defeated James and a French and Irish army at the Battle of the Boyne, in Ireland. The Protestants of Ulster, Ireland, backed William, and are still called Orangemen today. William became a hero to the Protestants of Ulster. On Orange Day, July 12, Orangemen still celebrate his victory in the Battle of the Boyne. We find Thomas Connelly belonging to the Presbyterian Church until his marriage to Mary Van Harlingen in Pennsylvania. Then they became active in the Dutch Reform Church movement. They moved back to the Guilford County, North Carolina area. It is written that many of the Dutch Reform people joined the Lutheran and Presbyterian Churches when moving from the North down into the Carolinas. It shows in pension records that Captain Henry Connelly belonged to the Presbyterian Church up to the time he moved to Kentucky, where he became active in the Baptist faith. It appears that the early Connelley brothers were probably Presbyterian."


Thomas Connally - History

Thomas Connelly
MSA SC 3520-18207

Thomas Connelly enlisted as a private in the Fourth Independent Company on January 25, 1776 under Captain James Hindman. [1]

Hindman&rsquos company originally played a role in the Maryland Council of Safety&rsquos plan to protect the Chesapeake Bay from potential British invasions. Colonel William Smallwood&rsquos Maryland battalion of nine companies were stationed in Baltimore and Annapolis while the independent companies were divided between the Eastern and Western shores. While centered at Oxford in Talbot County in the summer of 1776, Hindman&rsquos company received orders to march to New York to reinforce the Continental Army for a British invasion. The independent companies, including the Fourth Independent, arrived by mid-August 1776. [2]

On August 27, 1776, American forces faced British troops at the Battle of Brooklyn (also known as the Battle of Long Island), the first full-scale engagement of the war. Under heavy fire, the American troops attempted to retreat through Gowanus Creek, suffering severe losses in the process. To hold the British at bay, the remaining Marylanders who hadn&rsquot crossed the creek yet mounted a series of charges. The Maryland troops delayed the British long enough for the rest of the Continental Army to escape. Despite the loss of 256 men who were killed or captured, the bravery and sacrifice of the Maryland troops earned them the title of the "Maryland 400." [3]

Connelly and the Fourth Independent were spared the worst of the fighting, taking only minimal losses. Hindman defended his company against allegations of non-participation, and blamed their orders for preventing them from taking a more active role: "I have had the vanity to think the company I have had the honor to command have behaved themselves as well as in the service, notwithstanding the dark insinuations.that have been thrown out to their prejudice." [4]

Following the Battle of Brooklyn, the Fourth Independent fought at the Battle of White Plains, a continuation of the retreat from New York and an American loss. Connelly also witnessed victories at the battles of Trenton and Princeton in the winter of 1776-1777.

At the beginning of 1777, the issue of expiring enlistments came to call. Congress had required Maryland to raise eight new regiments as part of the force of 88 regiments of the Continental establishment. To fill this, soldiers were recruited from the nine companies of Smallwood&rsquos battalion and the independent companies. Despite seeing combat in four battles and suffering the privations of an ill-supplied army, Connelly reenlisted for a three year service term as a corporal in the Second Maryland Regiment commanded by Colonel Thomas Price. [5] As a corporal, Connelly was a disciplinarian within the company and forwarded the commands of the line officers. [6] He was placed in the company of Ely Dorsey. [7]

During 1777-1778, the British and American troops vied for control over the American capital at Philadelphia. As part of the American campaign, Connelly fought with the Second Regiment at the battles of Brandywine (September 1777) and Germantown (October 1777), both American losses. [8]

In May 1778, Connelly deserted. [9] Unfortunately, the reasons surrounding Connelly&rsquos desertion and details of his life afterwards are unknown.

Cassy Sottile, Explore America Research Intern, 2019

[2] Mark Andrew Tacyn, "To the End: The First Maryland Regiment and the American Revolution," (PhD diss., University of Maryland College Park, 1999), 34-45.

[7] Compiled Service Records of Soldiers Who Served in the American Army During the Revolutionary War, NARA M881, from Fold3.com.

[8] John Dwight Kilbourne, A Short History of the Maryland Line in the Continental Army, (Baltimore, The Society of the Cincinnati of Maryland, 1992), 17-26.


This web site is presented for reference purposes under the doctrine of fair use. When this material is used, in whole or in part, proper citation and credit must be attributed to the Maryland State Archives. PLEASE NOTE: The site may contain material from other sources which may be under copyright. Rights assessment, and full originating source citation, is the responsibility of the user.


What we're all about.

We currently stock over 160 whiskies made up of premium Irish, Scotch, Japanese and Bourbons. We continue to grow our premium range and we also offer whiskey tastings & events in our historic pub.

Premium GinIt's all about choice.

We are home to a growing selection of small batch, handmade premium Irish & international gins.

We stock premium tonics and mixers, while also offering a range of fresh garnishes of your choice.

Craft BeerSupporting Irish craftsmanship.

When it comes to our offerings, we have introduced many local and national Irish craft beers on draught. We’ve recently done a local collaboration to bring in our own Thomas Connolly IPA and Red Ale on draught.


Thomas Connally

(From notes of Bessie Myrtle Caldwell 1950's via Mark Caldwell).

Served as Private in the 4th troop of Lee's Legion, Continential troops in the Revolutionary War. Enlisted Sep 1, 1777 and was transferred to Maryland lines Sept 30, 1777.

Donated 100 acres of land in Chapel Hill NC for State University. Sources: A Goodgame from Mark Caldwell See "Trinity County Beginnings," Trinity County Book Committee, 1986, p 612-617. Correspondents: Jo Ann Dailey Balis Gene Dailey Shoultz Fay Collier Joy LeMasters Leroy S. Pool Irene Pool Leverett A.D. Corres.

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1738 Birth city: of Chapel Hill Birth state: NC 1,4725::551278

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Births Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,5769::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1738 Birth city: Chapel Hill Birth state: NC 1,4725::551277

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) Godfrey Memorial Library, comp. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,3599::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,2204::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1738 Birth city: of Chapel Hill Birth state: NC 1,4725::551278

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1738 Birth city: Chapel Hill Birth state: NC 1,4725::551277

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,2204::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Deaths Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,5771::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] 1820 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,7734::0

GEDCOM Source

1820 U S Census Census Place: Athens, Clarke, Georgia Page: 155 NARA Roll: M33_8 Image: 104 1,7734::1455081

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Virginia, Compiled Marriages, 1740-1850 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,3723::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1738 Birth city: of Chapel Hill Birth state: NC 1,4725::551278

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Births Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,5769::0

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1738 Birth city: Chapel Hill Birth state: NC 1,4725::551277

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] 1820 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,7734::0

GEDCOM Source

1820 U S Census Census Place: Athens, Clarke, Georgia Page: 155 NARA Roll: M33_8 Image: 104 1,7734::1455081

GEDCOM Source

@[email protected] 1790 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,5058::0

GEDCOM Source

Year: 1790 Census Place: Orange, North Carolina Series: M637 Roll: 7 Page: 97 Family History Library Film: 0568147 1,5058::186259


Thomas Terry (Tom) CONNALLY, Congress, TX (1877-1963)

CONNALLY Thomas Terry (Tom) , a Representative and a Senator from Texas born near Hewitt, McLennan County, Tex., August 19, 1877 attended the public schools graduated from Baylor University, Waco, Tex., in 1896 and from the law department of the University of Texas at Austin in 1898 admitted to the bar in 1898 and commenced practice in Waco, Tex. moved to Marlin, Falls County, Tex., in 1899 and continued the practice of law served as sergeant major in the Second Regiment, Texas Volunteer Infantry, during the Spanish-American War member, State house of representatives 1901-1904 prosecuting attorney of Falls County, Tex. 1906-1910 during the First World War became captain and adjutant of the Twenty-second Infantry Brigade, Eleventh Division, United States Army 1918 permanent chairman of Texas Democratic State convention in 1938 elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-fifth and to the five succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1917, until March 3, 1929) did not seek renomination in 1928, having become a candidate for Senator elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1928 reelected in 1934, 1940, and again in 1946, and served from March 4, 1929, to January 3, 1953, was not a candidate for renomination in 1952 chairman, Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds (Seventy-third through Seventy-seventh Congresses), Committee on Foreign Relations (Seventy-seventh through Seventy-ninth and Eighty-first and Eighty-second Congresses) member and vice chairman of the United States delegation to the United Nations Conference on International Organization at San Francisco in 1945 representative of the United States to the first session of the General Assembly of the United Nations at London and to the second session at New York in 1946 engaged in the practice of law in Washington, D.C., where he died on October 28, 1963 interment in Calvary Cemetery, Marlin, Tex.


Watch the video: Vyacheslav Molotov, Senator Tom Connally and UN dignitaries on first post war voy..HD Stock Footage (May 2022).