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Silver Penny of King John

Silver Penny of King John



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Silver Penny of King John - History

King John's Castle - History

Today, English Town, on the King’s Island, is at the heart of Limerick’s medieval core. King John’s Castle is located here, on the southern bank of the River Shannon, a little above the Curraghgower Falls. It was built to defend the river boundary and bridge between the Gaelic kingdoms to the west and the Norman kingdoms to the east and south. King John’s Castle acted as a watchdog on sailors and cargoes. It was also the administrative and military centre for the Norman kingdom of Limerick.

King John’s Castle was erected in the early years of the thirteenth century, probably between 1200 and 1210. It was a strong royal fortress built to withstand the power of new siege machines. Archaeological excavations have shown that it was built on the site of an earlier fortification. It is a five-sided castle, with high curtain walls surrounding a rectangular yard. The lower part of the walls was curved outwards to deflect missiles dropped from the battlements. Its massive gate towers and round corner towers were state-of-the-art features at the beginning of the thirteenth century. The corner towers jutted out to allow archers to fire on attackers in crossfire. Only part of the gatehouse survives. In its early years King John’s Castle was probably surrounded by a moat, with a drawbridge leading from the double-towered gatehouse to a foregate or barbican.

The castle courtyard had a banqueting hall, kitchens, military accommodation and stables. It did not have a keep or great tower.


The Castle Yard, 2003.

King John’s Castle was repaired and rebuilt many times down through the years. It was under siege on many occasions particularly during the seventeenth century. Click here to learn about the sieges of 1690 and 1691. The domestic buildings of the courtyard have been demolished but the remains of a thirteenth century hall can still be seen.


The Commanding Officer's House at Castle Barracks

In 1791, a military barracks was built within the castle. More than four hundred members of the British army lived here. They left in 1922.

In 1935, Limerick Corporation removed part of the castle walls and erected 22 houses in the castle-yard. These were demolished in 1989 and King John’s Castle was restored and developed as a tourist attraction.


Familiarisation

Viking coin-weight from Wareham, with inset silver penny of Ethelred I of Wessex © The Viking raids of the ninth century brought the raiders into regular contact with the monetary economies of western Europe. The Frankish Empire had a strong centralised coinage, which had been introduced by Charlemagne around the time of the first recorded raid. Although the Empire was divided after 840, the tradition of strong silver coinage continued in the various smaller kingdoms that replaced it.

The main Anglo-Saxon kingdoms each had their own coinage, and the wealth of Anglo-Saxon England was probably one of the main causes of the Viking expansion. East Anglia, Kent, Mercia and Wessex all had silver coinage, although the Kentish coinage disappeared after the kingdom was swallowed up by Wessex in the 820s. Northumbria also had a coinage, but unusually this was mostly made up of copper and bronze coins with a much lower value. These were apparently of very little interest to Viking raiders.

Both in England and on the Continent, native rulers regularly paid Viking raiders to leave them in peace.

Both in England and on the Continent, native rulers regularly paid Viking raiders to leave them in peace. The idea of 'Danegeld' is particularly associated today with the reign of Ethelred II (978-1016), whose policy of paying off the Vikings rather than fighting them was famously unsuccessful, and led to the conquest of England by Svein Forkbeard and Cnut. Such payments were also common in the ninth century, and both Anglo-Saxon and Frankish chronicles are full of references to rulers 'making peace' with the raiders. 'Making peace' was a polite expression for 'paying them to go away', and could involve large sums, such as the 7,000 pounds paid by the Frankish ruler Charles the Bald in 845. Even Alfred the Great, more famous for his military resistance, was forced to 'make peace' on occasion. A particular feature of late ninth-century England is the existence of small lead weights, with Anglo-Saxon coins set into the top. These were probably used by the Vikings to weigh out payments in coinage.


10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Penny

1. The word “penny” and its variations across Europe—including the German “pfennig” and the Swedish “penning”—originally denoted any sort of coin or money, not just a small denomination.

2. Offa, an Anglo-Saxon king, introduced the first English coin known as the penny around 790 A.D. it was made entirely of silver. Today’s British pennies (called “pence” when referring to a quantity of money) are worth one hundredth of a pound and minted in copper-plated steel.

3. The official term for the American penny is “one-cent piece.” However, when the U.S. Mint struck its first one-cent coins—then the size of today’s half-dollars and 100-percent copper—in 1793, Americans continued to use the British term out of habit.

4. Benjamin Franklin reportedly designed the first American penny in 1787. Known as the Fugio cent, it bears the image of a sun and sundial above the message “Mind Your Business.” A chain with 13 links, each representing one of the original colonies, encircles the motto “We Are One” on the reverse.

5. Along with the first U.S. penny’s design, the phrase 𠇊 penny saved is a penny earned” has been attributed to Benjamin Franklin. Visitors to the founding father’s grave in Philadelphia traditionally leave one-cent pieces there for good luck.

6. The copper content of U.S. pennies has declined over the years due to rising prices. The expensive metal makes up just 2.5 percent of one-cent pieces minted in 1982 or later nickels, dimes and quarters, on the other hand, are mainly composed of copper. Still, today’s pennies cost more than their face value𠅊n estimated 1.8 cents each—to produce.

7. In 1909, Teddy Roosevelt introduced the Lincoln cent to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of the 16th U.S. president’s birth. At the time, it was the first American coin to feature the likeness of an actual person (as opposed to the personifications of “liberty” appearing on earlier designs). Fifty years later the Lincoln Memorial was added to the penny’s reverse, complete with a tiny representation of the statue within.

8. The image of Abraham Lincoln on today’s American pennies was designed by Victor David Brenner, an acclaimed medalist who emigrated to the United States from Lithuania in 1890. Born Viktoras Barnauskas, Brenner had fled his native land after being persecuted for his Jewish ancestry.


Silver Penny of King John - History

Richard the Lionheart!


Anglo-Gallic, Richard I the Lionhearted, Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Billon denier, Melle mint (Deux-Sevres) mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS REX / PIC/TAVIE/NSIS ([County of] Poitou) in three lines across field. 19.5 mm, 0.94 g. ref: Elias 8, Duplessy Feodales 920, Poey d'Avant 2506, SCBC-SII 8008. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2585: $225 RARE Richard the Lionheart Portrait Coin!

England. Richard I. 1189-1199. RARE silver penny, portrait type! Short Cross type, class IVb. Canterbury mint. Uncertain moneyer. Crowned facing bust, holding scepter / Voided cross, with four pellets in angles. 17 mm, 1.06 g. ref: North 966 SCBC 1348B. aFine. #CM2196: $399

Bad King John!

Plantagenets. King John, 1199-1216 AD. Silver penny. Short Cross type, class 5b. London mint Ilger, moneyer. Crowned bust facing, holding scepter / ILGER ON LVND, Short cross with quatrefoils in quarters. 18.5 mm, 1.34g. ref: SCBC 1351. Slightly crimped in antiquity (likely intentional), near-black tone with lighter areas. #CM2336: $350
Plantagenets. King John, 1199-1216 AD. "John Lackland". Silver penny, cut for change in antiquity! Crowned bust facing, holding scepter / ILGER ON LVND, Short cross with quatrefoils in quarters. 18x9mm, 0.65 g. ref: SCBC 1351 for type. Dark tone with lighter highlights. Nicer visually than this photo suggests. #CM2964: $99 King George III
Great Britain. George III (1760 - 1820 AD). MASSIVE copper two pence "Cartwheel Penny" coin, dated 1797. Laureate bust of George III right, GEORGIUS III D.G. REX / Brittania seated upon a rock with shield, waves around, holding trident and olive branch, ship in the background, BRITANNIA 1797. Minted at Birmingham, England. GIGANTIC 41mm (1 5/8") diameter! 5mm (almost 1/4") thick! Weighs a whopping 54.38 grams. Deep reddish-brown tone. Ex De Père, WI collection. This coin is a monster! #CM3002: $175

Queen Elizabeth


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Sixpence. Fourth issue, dated 1573. Tower (London) mint im ermine. Crowned bust left, wearing ruff rose to right, ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEV 1573. 25mm, 3.06 g. ref: North 1997 SCBC 2562 for type. Toned, a few light scratches, small flan crack. Fine. From the J. Capozzolo Collection ex CNG. #CM2988: $299


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Sixpence. Fourth issue, dated 1574. Tower (London) mint im: eglantine/eglantine over acorn. Crowned bust left, wearing ruff rose to right, ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEV 1574. 25mm, 2.67 g. ref: North 1997 SCBC 2563 for type. Toned, scratches. Fine. Nice portrait! From the J. Capozzolo Collection ex CNG. #CM2989: $350
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Sixpence. Fourth issue, dated 1574. Tower (London) mint im: eglantine. Crowned bust left, wearing ruff rose to right, ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEV 1574. 26mm, 2.76 g. ref: North 1997 SCBC 2563 for type. Once cleaned, now retoning with some iridescence, a few scratches, peck mark, Great portrait! Good Fine. From the J. Capozzolo Collection ex CNG. #CM2990: $350 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Threepence. Fourth issue, dated 1573. Tower (London) mint im: acorn. Crowned bust left, wearing ruff rose to right, ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEV 1573. 19mm, 1.52 g. ref: North 1998 SCBC 2566 for type. Toned, flan flaw on obverse. Fine. From the J. Capozzolo Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Group Inventory 72732 (mid 1990s). #CM2991: $275
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Threepence. Fifth issue, dated 1579. Tower (London) mint im: Greek cross. Crowned bust left, wearing ruff rose to right, ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEV 1579. 19mm, 1.49 g. ref: North 1998 SCBC 2573 for type. Toned, a few scratches. Fine. Nice portrait! From the J. Capozzolo Collection ex CNG. #CM2992: $299

To make a purchase, or for more information, CLICK HERE


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Third/Fourth Issue silver sixpence. Dated 1563 (over 2) AD. Elizabeth's bust left with rose behind / Long cross over coat-of-arms arms with date above. Mintmark "Pheon." ref: S. 2561 N. 1997. Ex-Timeline Galleries, London. 26 mm, 3.02 g. Excellent portrait. #elz4112: $325 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Silver sixth Issue shilling, struck 1584-1595 AD. Elizabeth's bust left / Long cross over coat-of-arms arms with date above. Mintmark "Escallop." Fine. ref: S. 2577 N. 2014. Ex-Timeline Galleries, London. Huge 31 mm, 5.97 grams! #elz2171: $299 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Silver shilling, struck 1584-1595 AD. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left / Shield with Royal coat-of-arms. 15 mm, 0.59 g.Excellent detail on her portrait! A very nice little coin. #1277: $150 SOLD
Crusader Britain. Richard I the Lionheart!
Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS in two lines across field, cross above, W below / Crusader cross, AQVITANIE, cross above. ref: Elias 6. 18 mm, 0.73 g. Excellent detail! A wonderful coin. #CM2042x2: $325 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart.
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 18 mm, 0.81 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768. Excellent! From my own personal collection. #GVCM2062: $350 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Silver denier, Melle mint (Deux-Sevres). Cross pattee, +RICARDVS REX / PICTAVIENSIS in three lines across field. ref: Elias 8. 19 mm, 1.00 g. Great cabinet-tone with nice contrast. Well-centered. Ex-Spanish collection. #CM2102: $299 SOLD


Crusader Britain. Richard I the Lionheart.
Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Silver denier, Melle mint (Deux-Sevres). Cross pattee, +RICARDVS REX / PICTAVIENSIS in three lines across field. ref: Elias 8. 20 mm, 0.85 g. Glossy almost black patina with nice highlights. Well-centered. #CM2041: $250 SOLD


Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 18.5 mm, 0.89 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768. Lovely VF, nicely centered. ex-Jonathan Kern #CM2104: $275 SOLD


Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart.
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 19 mm, 0.74 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768. Near VF, lightly toned. #CM2068: $299 SOLD - Alternate available!


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Large Hammered silver Shilling, Sixth (North Third) issue. London mint, Struck 1582-1583. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGI" / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), "POSVI DEV ADIVTOREM MEV". Mintmark: Bell. 31mm, 5.80 g. ref: North 2014 SCBC 2577. Fine, toned. Well centered, nice portrait. From the Michael Joffre Collection ex-CNG. #CM2146: $325 SOLD


Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver penny, class 3b, Canterbury mint. Struck 1280-1281 AD. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, cross above, EDWRD ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant, CIVITAS CANTER. 19 mm, 1.37 g. ref: SCBI 39 (North), 84 North 1017 SCBC 1419. Good VF, toned. ex-CNG. Great portrait. #CM2155: $325 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Hammered silver sixpence. Third-Fourth (North Second) issues. London mint, Dated 1574. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, "ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HI REGINA" / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), date above, "POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM". Mintmark: eglantine. 25mm, 2.65 g. ref: North 1997 SCBC 2563. Good Fine. Well centered, incredible portrait! From the Michael Joffre Collection ex-CNG. #CM2145: $375 SOLD
House of Tudor. Henry VIII (1509-1547 AD). Large silver Groat. Second coinage. Tower (London) mint mintmark: fleur-de-lis. Struck 1538-1541 AD. Crowned & draped bust of Henry VIII right, hENRIC'· VIII'·D'·G'·R'·AGL'·Z·FRAnC' / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, with saltire in forks, POSVI-DEV'·A-DIVTORE'·MEV. 25mm, 2.49 g. ref: North 1797 SCBC 2337E. Near EF, toned, marks. ex-CNG. Nice! #CM2301: $475 SOLD
Medieval England. Richard I "Lionheart" Silver Penny. London mint, struck 1189-1199 AD, moneyer Stivene. Crowned bust facing, hEN]RICVS RE[X / Short cross, +STIVENE•ON•LVN. 19mm, 1.38g. ref: Spink 1346. Scarce! #CM2261: $199 SOLD
Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver penny, class 3c, London mint. Struck 1280-1281 AD. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, cross above, EDWRD ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant, CIVITAS LONDON. 17 mm, 1.00 g. ref: SCBI 39, 96 North 1018 SCBC 1389. #CM2231: $75 SOLD King Henry III

Medieval England. Plantagenets. Henry III, 1216-1272 AD. Silver Penny, Long cross, class IIIc. Bury St. Edmunds mint. His crowned facing bust, HENRICUS REX IIP / [moneyers name] S EDMVN, short voided cross with trefoils. ref: Seaby SE1364, North 988. 18 mm, 1.42 g. From my own personal collection. #CM2268: $135 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart, 1189-1199 AD. Silver denier, Poitou mint. Cross pattée annulet in fourth quarter / PIC/TAVIE/NSIS in three lines. 17.5mm, 0.65 g. ref: SCBC 8008 Elias 8g. VF, toned. From the R.D. Frederick Collection Ex Gemini IX (8 January 2012), lot 581 ex-CNG. #CM2286: $375 SOLD
Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver penny, class 9b1, York mint. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, cross above, EDWRD ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant, CIVITAS EBORACI. 19 mm, 1.01 g. ref: Spink # 1408. North 1037/1. Nicer than photo! #CM2234: $125 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Large Hammered silver shilling, Second issue, struck 1560-1561. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGI" / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), "POSVI DEV ADIVTOREM MEV". ref: Spink 2555. 30 mm, 5.85 g. #CM2128: $299 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver sixpence. Third/Fourth issue. London mint, dated 1571. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, ELIZABETH D G ANG FRA ET HIB REGINA / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM date 1571 above. 23 mm, 2.15 g. ref: Spink 2559-2563. #CM2466: $125 SOLD King Edward I

Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver penny, London mint. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, cross above, EDWRD ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant, CIVITAS LONDON. 19 mm, 1.30 g. ref: Seaby 1382. ex-Frank S. Robinson, Albany, NY. #CM2115: $199 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Hammered silver Threehalfpence, dated 1573. Third and Fourth issues. Tower (London) mint im: acorn. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, E D G ROSA SINE SPINA ("Elizabeth by the grace of God a rose without a thorn") / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), CIVITAS LONDON date 1573 above. 16mm, 0.66 g. ref: North 2000 SCBC 2569. Fine, deep gray tone, much darker than photo. From the Dr. William E. Triest Collection ex-CNG. #CM2487: $275 SOLD
Medieval England. House of Plantagenets. Edward III, 1312-1377 AD. Silver, half-groat, "Series D”, London mint. Struck 1352-1353 AD. His crowned bust facing in a tressure, +EDWARDVS REX ANGLI Z FRACI / + POSVI DEV ADIVTOREM CIVITAS LONDON with English M in two circles around long cross with four sets of three dots in the inner quarters. 20 mm, 1.88 g. ref: Seaby 1575 North 1154. Dark gray cabinet tone. ex-Nick Jamgochian collection, Glendale, CA, formed in the 1920’s-1950’s. #CM2583: $150 SOLD


Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. RARE TYPE!
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w (retrograde "S"!) / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 18 mm, 0.66 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768-var. Dark gray patina, light deposits. Rare! ex-London, UK collection. #CM2503: $250 SOLD


Medieval England. House of Tudor. Henry VII, 1485-1509 AD. Silver Groat, “profile” issue, struck 1505-1509 AD, London mint. His crowned bust right, HENRIC' x VII x DI x GRA x REX x AGL x Z x F' (pheon above) / Long cross over arms. POSVI DEV' : AVDITORE : MEV’, (pheon above). 26 mm, 2.93 g. ref: North 1747. Dark gray old collection cabinet tone. ex-Nick Jamgochian collection, Glendale, CA, formed in the 1920’s-1950’s. #CM2582: $650 SOLD
England. House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Threepence, Tower (London) mint, 5th Issue, struck 1580 AD. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, E D G ROSA SINE SPINA ("Elizabeth by the grace of God a rose without a thorn") / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM im: Latin cross. 19mm, 1.25 g. Slightly crinkled flan. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2680: $175 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Halfgroat. Sixth Issue, struck 1582-1583 AD, Tower (London) mint. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, E D G ROSA SINE SPINA ("Elizabeth by the grace of God a rose without a thorn") / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), CIVITAS LONDON. 16mm, 1.05 g. ex De Père, WI collection. Dark gray patina. Nice portrait! ex De Père, WI collection. #CM2726: $175 SOLD


Medieval England. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver Penny. New coinage, class 3c. Lincoln mint, struck 1280-1281 AD. Crowned facing bust / Long cross pattée triple pellets in quarters. 19mm, 1.41 g. ref: SCBI 39 (North), 106 (same obv. die) North 1018 SCBC 1389. VF. Ex-CNG. #CM2786: $350 SOLD


Medieval England. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver Penny. New coinage, class 4d. London mint, struck 1282-1289 AD. Crowned facing bust / Long cross pattée triple pellets in quarters. 19mm, 1.43 g. ref: SCBI 39 (North), 247 North 1026 SCBC 1397. VF. Ex-CNG. #CM2787: $299 SOLD


Medieval England. House of Lancaster. Henry VI, 1422-1461 AD. Large silver Groat, struck 1422-1427. Annulet issue, Calais mint. His crowned bust facing within polylobe, annulets flanking, HENRIC x D x GRA x REX x ANGL xSx FRANC (pierced cross) / Long cross pattée, trefoils in quadrands, two of which have central annulets (pierced cross) POSVI o DEVM : AVDITORE' x DEVM around VILLA:CALAISIE:. 26.5 mm, 3.78 g. ref: Seaby 1836, North 1424. Wonderful gray cabinet tone, exceptional detail! ex-Nick Jamgochian collection, Glendale, CA, formed in the 1920’s-1950’s. #CM2579: $450 SOLD
IRELAND. "Bad King John". As King, 1199-1216 AD. Silver Penny. Third ('Rex') coinage. Dublin mint Roberd, moneyer. Struck c. 1207-1211 AD. Crowned facing bust, holding cruciform scepter rosette to right all within triangle / Pinwheel (sun) within crescent moon three stars around all within triangle three crosses pattée around legend. 19mm, 1.16 g. ref: D&F 50 SCBC 6228. Toned, scratches. VF. From the WCN Collection. Ex Glendining’s (5 February 1992), lot 196 (part of) ex-CNG. #CM2679: $550 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Silver sixpence, minted 1589. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind,
"ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA"
Shield with arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis),
"POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM"
26 mm, 2.96 g. Excellent silver! Great coin. Ex-Frank S Robinson collection. #3290: $225 SOLD


Edward I "Longshanks" of England
1279 - 1307 AD. Silver penny
obv: Facing bust of King Edward
rev: Long cross with three pellets in each quadrant.
#656: $75 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I.
Silver threepence, dated 1573.
Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind,
"ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA"
Shield with arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis),
"POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM 1573"
19 mm, 1.44 g. Great grey cabinet tone. #06685: $325 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I.
Silver sixpence, dated 1594.
Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind,
"ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGI"
Shield with arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis),
"POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM 1554"
26 mm, 2.72 g. Magnificent example! #76100: $375 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Hammered silver sixpence, dated 1569. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA", Mint mark coronet above / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), date above, "POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM". Intermediate bust, Third and Fourth coinage. Spink ref #2562. 26 mm, 2.58 g. #CM2085: $225 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Large silver sixth-issue shilling struck 1587-1589 AD. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGI", crescent mint mark above / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), "POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM". Big 31 mm, 5.88 g. Excellent cabinet tone. #CM2086: $375 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Hammered silver half groat, London mint. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, ROSA SINE SPINA ER / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), CIVITAS LONDON. ref: S2579. 17 mm, 0.85 g. ex-Frank S. Robinson. #CM2105: $125 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Hammered silver sixpence, dated 1578/7. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, "ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA" / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), date above, "POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM". Well centered, visible portrait. Light scratches otherwise quite nice. 26 mm, 2.50 g. Nice patina, terrible photo! ex-Frank S. Robinson, Albany, NY. #CM2116: $250
SOLD
Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver penny, London mint. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, cross above, EDWRD ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant, CIVITAS LONDON. 20 mm, 1.26 g. ref: Seaby 1382. ex-Frank S. Robinson, Albany, NY. Nice contrast, coin nicer than photo! #CM2185: $150 SOLD


House of Tudor. Henry VIII (1509-1547 AD). Large silver Groat. Second coinage. Tower (London) mint mintmark: rose. Struck 1526-1544 AD. Crowned & draped bust of Henry VIII right, hENRIC'· VIII'·D'I·G'·R'·AGL'·Z·FRAnC' / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI-DEV'·A DIVTORE'·MEV. 24mm, 2.31 g. ref: North 1797 SCBC 2337E. VF, toned, old light scratches on reverse under tone. Awesome portrait! #CM2205: $425 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Hammered silver sixpence, Fifth issue, dated 1592 AD. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGI" / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), "POSVI DEV ADIVTOREM MEV". 26 mm, 3.01 g. ref: Spink 2578A. Toned, Fine+ with great portrait! #CM2159: $325 SOLD
Plantagenets. King John, 1199-1216 AD. Silver Penny. Short Cross type, class Vb1/Va2, London mint Fulke, moneyer. Struck in the name and types of Henry II, 1205. Crowned facing bust, holding scepter / + FVLKE • ON • LVND, voided short cross quatrefoils in angles. 18mm, 1.25 g. Cf. SCBI 56 (Mass), 1257 North 970bi/969aii SCBC 1350C. VF, toned, holed to be used as jewelry in antiquity! From the R.D. Frederick Collection, ex-CNG. #CM2285: $450 SOLD King Henry V

Great Britain. Lancastrians. Henry V, 1413-1422 AD. Silver penny, York mint. Crowned bust of Henry V facing within circle of pellets. Mullet to both left and right of crown / Cross with Quatrefoil in center dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant. 14 mm, 0.40 g. ref: Spink # 1790. North 1404. Edges clipped in antiquity. A rare type! #CM2230: $99 SOLD


Medieval England, House of Lancaster. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461 AD. Silver Halfpenny. Annulet issue, London mint. Struck 1422-1430 AD. His crowned facing bust, HENRIC’ REX ANGL’ / Long cross three pellets in quarters, double saltire stops, annulets in 2nd and 3rd quarters, VIL LA CAL IS’. 14mm, 0.44 g. ref: North 1434 SCBC 1848. VF, toned. ex-CNG. #CM2225: $225 SOLD


Great Britain. Charles I (1625-1649 AD). Copper "rose" farthing. Rose with double-arched crown above, FRAN : ET · HIB : REX / Crown with double arch crossed scepters through the crown, CAROLVS · D : G MAG BRIT. 13 mm, 0.75 g. Lovely coppery tone. ref: Spink 3201-3205 Peck 288-326 Montagu 5-6. #CM2331: $125 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver sixpence. Third issue. London mint, dated 1564. Mintmark: pheon. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, ELIZABETH D G ANG FRA ET HIB REGINA / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM date 1564 above. 23.3 mm, 2.22 g. ref: North 1997 SCBC 2561. Toned Fine. Nice portrait! #CM2317: $275 SOLD
Medieval England. Richard I "Lionheart" Silver Penny. London mint, struck 1189-1199 AD, moneyer Stivene. Crowned bust facing, hEN]RICVS RE[X / Short cross, +STIVENE•ON•LVN. 18.5mm, 1.03g. ref: Spink 1346. Scarce! #CM2330: $275 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart.
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-W / Crusader cross pattee, +AQVITANIE, small cross above. 17.9 mm, 0.62 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768. Fine. Ex Seltman, bought 10/16/83. #CM2226: $299 SOLD Scotland! James VI and I

Medieval Scotland. House of Stuart. James VI and I, 1566-1625 AD. Silver Sixpence, dated 1606. “Third bust”, mintmark: escallop. His mantled, crowned bust right, VI behind, IACOBVS : D : G : MAG BRIT : FRA : ET : HIB : REX / Sheild of arms, date above, QVA . DEVS . CONIVNXIT . NEMO . SEPARET. 26mm, 2.81 g. ref: Seaby SE2657. Dark gray old collection cabinet tone. ex-Nick Jamgochian collection, Glendale, CA, formed in the 1920’s-1950’s. #CM2580: $225 SOLD King Edward II

Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward II, 1307-1327 AD. Silver penny, class 11a2, London mint. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, cross above, EDWRD ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant, CIVITAS LONDON. 19 mm, 1.07 g. Cracked flan. ref: Spink # 1455. North 1060/2. #CM2239: $65 SOLD
Medieval England. House of Lancaster. Henry VI, 1422-1461 AD. Silver Groat, London mint. First reign. Leaf-pellet issue, 1445-1454 AD. His crowned facing bust in tressure of arches HENRIC x D x GRA x REX x ANGL xSx FRANC / Long cross pattée, three pellets in angles, POSVI DEVM AVDITORE MEVM around CIVITAS LONDON. 25 mm, 2.83 g. ref: Seaby 1917 (sim). Wonderful gray cabinet tone with rainbow tone in some recesses, nice detail! ex-Nick Jamgochian collection, Glendale, CA, formed in the 1920’s-1950’s. #CM2581: $250 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Hammered silver sixpence, dated 1575. Mintmark: pheon. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, ELIZABETH D G ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM date 1575 above. 20mm, 1.42 g. ref: SCBC 2561v. Slightly crinkled. #CM2409: $150 SOLD


Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 19 mm, 0.92 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768-var. Dark gray patina, good contrast. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2587: $350 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Silver denier, Melle mint (Deux-Sevres). Crusader cross pattee, +RICARDVS REX / PICTAVIENSIS in three lines across field. 19.8 mm, 1.04 g. ref: Elias 8. Nice VF with sharp detail. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2664: $299 SOLD
Medieval England, c. 15th Century AD. Time of the Lancastrians through Tudors. Neat Medieval iron buckle with original leather strap! Rectangular in shape with two small rivets holding the leather in place. 2 1/4" x 1 7/8" (5.7 x 4.8 cm). Well-preserved and stable. Ex Los Angeles private collection. #AM2074: $275 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Threepence, Dated 1581. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, ELIZABETH D G ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM. 19mm, 1.59 g. ref: SCBC 2566-var. Ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2733: $150 SOLD
Great Britain. Copper Halfpenny Token, dated 1793. “Industry has its Sure Reward.” Neat token with a beehive on one side and a heron on the other. Edge with fine hatched-line design. 27mm, 9.32 g. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2642: $150 SOLD


Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Billon denier, Melle mint (Deux-Sevres) mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS REX / PICTAVIENSIS in three lines across field. ref: Elias 8. 20 mm, 0.96 g. Nice gray cabinet-tone. Well-centered. ex-Nick Jamgochian private collection, Glendale, CA, purchased November 1952, with original envelope! #CM2577: $275 SOLD


Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. RARE TYPE!
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w (retrograde "S"!) / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 18 mm, 0.67 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768-var. This is the rare variety with the omega above RICARDVS and the cross below (as opposed to the other way around). There are a few minor deposits, otherwise very good condition. ex-London, UK collection. #CM2497: $250 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Penny, Tower (London) mint. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, E D G ROSA SINE SPINA ("Elizabeth by the grace of God a rose without a thorn") / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), CIVITAS LONDON. 16mm, 0.47g. Slightly bent. ref: SCBC 2575. Dark gray tone. Great portrait! #CM2488: $225 SOLD
Great Britain. George III (1760 - 1820 AD). MASSIVE copper two pence "Cartwheel Penny" coin, dated 1797. Laureate bust of George III right, GEORGIUS III D.G. REX / Brittania seated upon a rock with shield, waves around, holding trident and olive branch, ship in the background, BRITANNIA 1797. Minted at Birmingham, England. GIGANTIC 41mm (1 5/8") diameter! 5mm (almost 1/4") thick! Weighs a whopping 57.38 grams. Deep reddish-brown tone. This coin is a monster! Ex Ipswich, Suffolk, UK collection. #CM2743: $175 SOLD - Ask about alternate!


Great Britain. House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I.
Silver sixpence struck 1595.
Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind,
"ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA"
Shield with arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis),
"POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM 1595"
26 mm, 2.34 g. Slightly wavy flan. Nice but worn coin, washed out photo. ref: CE 2596. ex-Guildcraft 1992. #MLV023: $125 SOLD

King James

Great Britain. James I, 1603-1625 AD. Large silver shilling,
struck c. 1604-1619. Crowned bust of James rt., XII behind, IACOBVS D G MAG BRIT FRA ET HI REX / Royal coat of arms with Scottish rampant lion and Irish harp, QVAE DEVS CONIVNXIT NEMO SEPARET. Large 32 mm, 5.75 g. ex-Guildcraft 1992. Magnificent! #MLV048: $375 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. Nice detail, well-centered. ref: Elias 4. 18 mm, 0.78 g. ex-Civrac. The nicest I've ever had! #CM2099x2: $399 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Hammered silver sixpence, dated 1567. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZABETH DG ANG FR ET HIB REGINA", Mint mark coronet above / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), date above, "POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM". 27 mm, 2.97 g. Third and fourth issue. Excellent portrait! Nice cabinet tone. #CM2087: $375 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I. Hammered silver three pence, dated 1582. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, "ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGI", sword mintmark / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), date above, "POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM". Fifth issue. Nice coin with a strong portrait. Spink ref #2573. 18 mm, 1.30 g. #CM2084: $225 SOLD

King Edward I

Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver penny, Canterbury mint. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, EDW R ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle, CIVITAS CANTOR. ref: S1419. 20 mm, 1.36 g. #CM2090: $275 SOLD King Henry III

Great Britain. Plantagenets. Henry III, 1216-1272 AD. Silver penny, Moneyer Nicole, Canterbury mint. Crowned head of Henry III facing, HENRICVS REX III / Long cross with three pellets in each quadrant, NICOLE ON CANT. ref: Seaby 1368. Bold detail, strong portrait. 18 mm, 1.46 g. ex-Frank S. Robinson, Albany, NY. #CM2114: $275 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart.
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w / Crusader cross pattee, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 18 mm, 0.73 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768. Near VF, lightly toned. ex- M. Julien collection, Angliers, France. #CM2147: $299 SOLD


Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Silver denier, Melle mint (Deux-Sevres). PICTAVIENSIS in three lines / Crusader cross pattee, +RICARDVS REP. ref: Elias 8. 19 mm, 1.05 g. Great cabinet-tone with nice contrast. Well-centered. #CM2157: $350 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Large Hammered silver shilling, Second (North First) issue. London mint, struck 1560-1561. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZABETH DG ANG FRA ET HI REGINA" / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), "POSVI DEV ADIVTOREM MEV". Mintmark: cross crosslet. 32mm, 6.44 g. ref: North 1985 SCBC 2555. Good Fine, lightly toned. Well centered, nice portrait. From the Michael Joffre Collection ex-CNG. #CM2144: $325 SOLD


House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Large Hammered silver shilling, 5th issue. London mint, struck 1594-1596. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, "ELIZAB DG ANG FR ET HIB REGI" / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), "POSVI DEV ADIVTOREM MEV". Mintmark: woolpack. 32 mm, 5.64 g. ref: Sp-2577. Broad-flan, F/VF with bold legends, nicely toned all over. ex-Frank S. Robinson. #NAV134: $325 SOLD


House of Tudor. Henry VIII (1509-1547 AD). Large silver Groat. Second coinage. Tower (London) mint mintmark: Arrow. Struck 1526-1544 AD. Crowned & draped bust of Henry VIII right, hENRIC'· VIII'·D'·G'·R'·AGL'·Z·FRAnC' / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI-DEV'·A-DIVTORE'·MEV. ref: S-2337E. 25mm, 2.48g. Good Fine. Old collection toning, light scratches.
Awesome portrait! #CM2246: $475 SOLD


Great Britain. Plantagenets. Edward I, 1272-1307 AD. Silver penny, class 3c, London mint. Struck 1280-1281 AD. Crowned bust of Edward I facing within circle of pellets, cross above, EDWRD ANGL DNS HYB / Long cross dividing legend into quarters, three pellets in each quadrant, CIVITAS LONDON. 19 mm, 1.35 g. ref: SCBI 39 (North), 96 North 1018 SCBC 1389. VF, lightly toned. Excellent! #CM2156: $350 SOLD


Plantagenets. King John, 1199-1216 AD. Silver Penny, Short Cross type, class 5c, London mint. Cut penny, used to make change! Crowned facing bust, holding scepter, hENRICVS REX / Short cross with quatrefoils in each angle, WALTER ON LVN. 19x9 mm, 0.65 g. ref: Seaby 1352. #CM2314: $135 SOLD
Great Britain. George III (1760 - 1820 AD). MASSIVE copper two pence "Cartwheel Penny" coin, dated 1797. Laureate bust of George III right, GEORGIUS III D.G. REX / Brittania seated upon a rock with shield, waves around, holding trident and olive branch, ship in the background, BRITANNIA 1797. Minted at Birmingham, England. GIGANTIC 40mm (1 5/8") diameter! 5mm (almost 1/4") thick! Weighs a whopping 56.35 grams. Deep reddish-brown tone. This coin is a monster! #CM2405: $175 SOLD King Henry VIII

House of Tudor. Henry VIII. 1509-1547. Silver Halfpenny, struck 1526-1544. Second coinage, Tower (London) mint mintmark: lis. His crowned facing bust / Long cross pattée, with three pellets in angles. 11.5mm, 0.30 g. ref: Withers V 1B North 1815 SCBC 2356. VF, toned, a bit rough. Good portrait. From the J. Eric Engstrom Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Auctions XX (25 March 1992), lot 1311. #CM2385: $299 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Hammered silver Threepence, dated 1574. Third and Fourth issues. Tower (London) mint im: eglantine. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, rose behind, ELIZABETH D G ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM date 1574 above. ref: North 1998 SCBC 2566. 19mm, 1.46 g. Near VF, deep gray tone, much darker than photo. From the Dr. William E. Triest Collection ex-CNG. #CM2486: $299 SOLD
Great Britain. George III (1760 - 1820 AD). MASSIVE copper two pence "Cartwheel Penny" coin, dated 1797. Laureate bust of George III right, GEORGIUS III D.G. REX / Brittania seated upon a rock with shield, waves around, holding trident and olive branch, ship in the background, BRITANNIA 1797. Minted at Birmingham, England. GIGANTIC 40mm (1 5/8") diameter! 5mm (almost 1/4") thick! Weighs a whopping 55.86 grams. Deep reddish-brown tone. This coin is a monster! #CM2485: $175 SOLD
Great Britain. George III, 1787-1820. Silver Sixpence, dated 1787, Engraved "ET”. His laureate, draped bust right, GEORGIVS III DEI GRATIA / Crowned cruciform coat-of-arms around rayed Garter star, M B F ET H REX F D B ET L D S R I A T ET E 1787. Engraved "ET" by an early owner of the coin! Perhaps an individual’s initials. Nice portrait, light cabinet tone. 21.5 mm, 2.94 g. #CM2315: $99 SOLD
Plantagenets. King John, 1199-1216 AD. Silver penny. Short Cross type, class Vb2. Winchester mint Lukas, moneyer. Struck c. 1205. Crowned bust facing, holding scepter / + MILES ON WINC, Short cross with quatrefoils in quarters. 17mm, 1.29g. ref: North 970 SCBC 1351. VF, toned, areas of light weakness. Ex 1970 Gisors (Eure) Hoard. Ex-CNG. Rare! #CM2422: $399 SOLD
Great Britain. George III (1760 - 1820 AD). MASSIVE copper two pence "Cartwheel Penny" coin, dated 1797. Laureate bust of George III right, GEORGIUS III D.G. REX / Brittania seated upon a rock with shield, waves around, holding trident and olive branch, ship in the background, BRITANNIA 1797. Minted at Birmingham, England. GIGANTIC 41mm (1 5/8") diameter! 5mm (almost 1/4") thick! Weighs a whopping 55.87 grams. Deep reddish-brown tone. This coin is a monster! #CM2618: $175 SOLD - Ask about alternate! King Henry VIII - Ex Canterbury Cathedral!

Tudor England. Henry VIII, Profile Halfgroat, struck 1526-1532 AD, Canterbury mint. Archbishop Warham. Bust of Henry VIII in profile, HENRIC VIII D G R AGL Z FR legend and 'cross patonce' mintmark / Long cross over arms dividing W - A initials and CIVI TAS CAN TOR legend for Canterbury mint with 'T' mintmark. 20mm, 1.23 g., card 55 x 20mm. Good very fine once pierced and plugged behind bust. ex-property of a Kent, UK collector ex R Dalton, Littlebourne, UK collection loaned to and exhibited at Canterbury Cathedral. This coin, together with other coins connected with Canterbury, was exhibited at Canterbury Cathedral under the title 'Minting at Canterbury' and was loaned by Mr R. Dalton of Littlebourne the original descriptive card is included. This coin and story is fantastic! #CM2620: $750 SOLD Henry VIII

Tudor England. Henry VIII, Facing Bust Penny, struck 1544-1547 AD. Third coins age, London mint. His facing bust with H D G ROSA SINE SP around / Long cross over arms dividing CIVI TAS LON DON legend for London mint. 14.5 x 16 mm, 0.51 grams. Good very fine. Provenance: Found in Wiltshire, UK, in 2005. Literature: S. 2380 N. 1854. Ex Wiltshire, UK collection. A very rare type! #CM2619: $399 SOLD
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Large silver Groat. Second issue. Tower (London) mint mm: cross crosslet. Struck 1560-1561 AD. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, ELIZABETH D G ANG FR ET HIB REGINA / Coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée, POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM. 24mm, 1.96g. ref: North 1986 SCBC 2556. Slightly crinkled flan. #CM2494: $299 SOLD
Great Britain. George III (1760 - 1820 AD). MASSIVE copper two pence "Cartwheel Penny" coin, dated 1797. Laureate bust of George III right, GEORGIUS III D.G. REX / Brittania seated upon a rock with shield, waves around, holding trident and olive branch, ship in the background, BRITANNIA 1797. Minted at Birmingham, England. GIGANTIC 41mm (1 5/8") diameter! 5mm (almost 1/4") thick! Weighs a whopping 55.45 grams. Deep reddish-brown tone. This coin is a monster! #CM2656: $175 SOLD - ask about alt.!
House of Tudor. Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603 AD. Silver Penny. Fifth issue. Tower (London) mint mm: Latin cross. Struck 1580-1581 AD. Crowned bust of Elizabeth left, E D G ROSA SINE SPINA ("Elizabeth by the grace of God a rose without a thorn") / Shield with large cross and coat of arms (passant lions and fleur-de-lis), CIVITAS LONDON. 15mm, 0.49g. ref: SCBC 2575. #CM2493: $225 SOLD


‘The gift of this history’

John King was in his first year as education secretary when he got a call in 2016 from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The historically black college said it had discovered that his paternal grandmother, Estelle King, graduated from the school’s predecessor in 1894, before becoming a nurse. Would he want to give a speech at the school? Sure, he said.

The call prompted a dive into his family’s past. Last year, he enlisted the help of Christine McKay, a retired archivist from the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture who had once discovered Obama’s father’s letters, some of which he’d written from Kenya imploring universities in the United States for financial aid.

McKay wanted to know everything about the Kings. She started with John’s great-great-grandmother, Lydia King, who was born about 1822. She combed the records of the Freedman’s Bank — established after the Civil War for freed people — and found two of her accounts, suggesting she’d probably been enslaved. The records also listed the names of four of Lydia’s children: John, Sophia, Anne and Charles.

McKay consulted the Maryland State Archives, which keeps voluminous records chronicling the state’s history of slavery, which spanned from shortly after its Colonial founding in the 17th century to November 1864, when the state abolished it. (The Emancipation Proclamation of Jan. 1, 1863, freed enslaved people only in seceded states, exempting border states such as Maryland, where there were more than 87,000 enslaved blacks in 1860.) In her search, McKay found a slave census.

A Maryland clan traces its roots to slavery.

Many members of John B. King Jr.&rsquos family lived remarkable lives, including John B. King Sr., New York City&rsquos first black deputy schools chief Lt. Col. Haldane King, a Tuskegee Airman and William &ldquoDolly&rdquo King, one of the first black pro basketball players.


Coinage

Values in the treasure were calculated in pounds, shillings and pence (12 pence = a shilling and 20 shillings = a pound), although there were no coins equal to pounds and shillings and would not be until Henry VII's reign.

For the purposes of accounting marks were used, worth 13 shillings and 4 pence (the noble, therefore, fitted both systems well, being worth a third of a pound and half a mark).

  • Gold noble (6 shillings and 8 pence)
  • Gold quarter-noble (1 shilling and 8 pence)
  • Silver groat (4 pence)
  • Silver penny

The noble was the highest value coin in England (and probably in Europe). At 6s. 8d. it was worth a third of a pound or half a mark.

The design of a king standing in a ship (see photograph) was introduced by Edward III in 1344, when the coin itself was first produced as part of England's first successful revival of gold coinage. The design may be a reference to the great naval victory at Sluys (1340), the first victory of the Hundred Years War, although it may be simply a reference to the image of the king as captain of the ship of state.

The design was also used for the half-noble (not illustrated), but was too elaborate for the small quarter-noble, which instead had the shield of England and France. The silver coinage carried the facing stylised bust of a king, a general design introduced by Edward I in 1279, which would survive until the Tudors.

The silver coinage was that used in daily business, with the groat of fourpence supported by the half-groat, and the penny by the fractional denominations of the halfpenny and farthing. The daily wages of a master craftsman might be sixpence.


Silver Penny of King John - History

Metal detecting holidays in England

with the Worlds most successful metal detecting club

Twinned with Midwest Historical Research Society USA

Scottish and Irish Coins Page

Fascinating hammered copper coin -with Scottish Thistle on rev.
Charles I (1625-1649) copper turner or half groat (two pence). Obverse: Crowned "CR". Legend: "CAR D G SCOT ANG FRA ET HIB R" (Charles by the grace of God King of Scotland England France and Ireland). Reverse: Thistle: "NEMO ME INPVNE LACESSET" (No one shall hurt me with impunity).

Pre 1603 James VI Eightpenny copper groat - Before accession to English Throne - Not issued for the first 16 yeras of his reign from 1567

1165 -1214 William 1st The Lion Scottish hammered silver half penny

Money Walter Adam - Edinburgh

1195 Scottish William 1 The Lion hammered silver penny

Short cross and stars issue Class I

Moneyer RAUL ON ROCEBU (Raul of Roxburgh)

Bust of pellets facing left, the king holding a sceptre

This appears to be an extremely rare 1205 - 1230 AD William 1st The Lion of Scotland short cross hammered silver penny.

The obv legend clearly shows a 'US' which only matches one moneyer Henri Le Rus whuch is classed as extremely rare, great find

1195 - 1230 William 1 The Lion of Scotland hammered silver penny - Short cross and stars issue

Rev ADAM ON RORE - Moneyer Adam of Roxburgh mint

1195 Scottish William 1 The Lion hammered silver half penny

Short cross and stars issue Class I

Moneyer RAUL ON ROCEBU (Raul of Roxburgh)

1205 Willam 1 The Lion - Scottish hammered silver penny

Moneyer Walter of Perth, Edinburgh and Roxburgh mints

Scottish medieval hammered silver short cross farthing

6 pointed star in quadrant in reverse

Great find - an Alexander II 1214-49 Scottish hammerd penny - rear legend does not match those in reference books- should be

PIERIS ON RO - Pierres of Roxburgh - Adam was also out of Roxburgh so the legend looks like the two combined

1205 Willam 1 The Lion - Scottish hammered silver penny

Moneyer Walter of Perth, Edinburgh and Roxburgh mints

Alexander II 1230-35 Scottish hammered silver penny - struck in name of William

Rev ** .ON.ROE AIM - Moneyer Aimer of Roxburgh mint

Alexander II 1214-49 Scottish hammered silver short cross half penny

Rev **** ON ROE - Roxburgh mint

Alexander II 1214-49 Scottish hammered silver halfpenny

Alexander II 1214-49 Scottish hammerd silver voided long penny

Rev GEF/RAI/ON/AYR - Moneyer Gefrai of Ayr mint

Alexander II 1214-49 Scottish hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Rev HAN/ON/ - Moneyer Wilam Iohan of uncertain mint

Alexander II 1214-49 Scottish hammerd penny

1249 Scottish Alexander III hammered silver penny

Moneyer Ion Cokin of Perth mint

Scotland Alexander II 1214-1249 hammered silver half penny

Obv WILLRLMUS REX - King William

Scottish 1249 Alexander III hammered silver penny - Class 3

Moneyer Nicole of Edinburgh

Scotland Alexander 1249-1286 hammered silver penny Class 4

Rev -REX SCOTORUM - King of Scotland

1280 - 1286 Alexander III 2nd coinage Class 1

REV REX SCOTORUM - King of Scots

Stunningly crisp example of a 1280 1286 Alexander III Scottish hammered silver penny - 2nd Coinage

Stars have 6 points Ref SA3HD-005

1249 Alexander Scottish hammered silver half penny

1280 - 1286 Scottish Alexander III hammered silver half penny - 2nd coinage

Long cross, a star in two quarters, each star has 6 points - type SA3HD -010

1280 1286 Alexander III Scottish hammered silver penny - 2nd Coinage

Stars have 6 points Ref SA3HD-005

Scotland Alexander III 1249-1286 hammered silver penny

Rev -REX SCOTORUM - King of Scotland

Scottish 1249 Alexander III hammered silver farthing

Rev /WI/ - moneyer Wilam of Fres mint

1280 - 1286 Alexander III hammered silver penny

REV REX SCOTORUM - King of Scots

1280 1286 Alexander III Scottish hammered silver penny - 2nd Coinage

Stars have 6 points Ref SA3HD-005

1280 - 1286 Alexander III Scottish hammered silver penny - 2nd Coinage

Stars have 6 points Ref SA3HD-005

1280 -86 Scottish Alexander III hammered silver penny

1280 -86 Scottish Alexander III hammered silver half penny

Scottish 1249 Alexander III hammered silver half penny - Class 5

Rev ARE:/WA** - Moneyer Walter of Ayr mint

1280-1286 Alexander III Scottish hammered silver penny - 2nd coinage - Class 8

Stars have 7 points - 28 total in 4 quadrants

Scottish 1357-1367 David II hammered silver penny - 2nd coinage - Stars with 5 points with pellet at centre

Obv DAVID REX SCOTTORUM - king of Scots

Rev VILLA EDINBURGH - Town of Edinburgh

First ever Scottish groat we have found

1329-71 David II hammered silver groat

Obv DAVID DEI GRA REX SCOTORUM

Rev VILL/AED/INBV/RGH- Edinburgh mint

1636 Scottish Charles 1st hammered silver twenty pence

Obv CAR D G SCOT ANG FR & HIB FR - Briot's 2nd hammered issue

1637- 1642 Scottish Charles 1st machine made forty pence silver coin - Briot's issue- XL by bust

Rev SALUS REIPVIBLICE SUPREMA LEX - Crown over thistle

Charles 1st Scottish 30 shillings 14.95g, 35.63mm

Obv - CAROLUS D.G MAGN BRITAN FRAN ET HIB REX B - Charles by the grace of God King of Britain France and Ireland B(riot)

Rev QUAE DEUS CONIVNXIT NEMO SEPARET - What God hath joined together let no man put asunde

Huge, James 1st Scottish Merk sometimes known as the half thistle dollar and value of 13 shillings and 4 pence

James 1st Scottish Merk sometimes known as the half thistle dollar and value of 13 shillings and 4 pence

James VI of Scotland 1601- 1604 hammered silver 1/4 Thistle Merk or half noble as it was sometimes known value 3 shillings and 4 pence ( 40 pence )

James VI of SCotland hammered silver Eighth Thistle Merk ( 20 pence)

Obv IACOBUS 6 D.G.R.SCOTORUM - James VI by the grace of god king of the Scots

Rev REGEM IOVA PROTEGIT 1602 - Jehovah protects the King 1602

Scotland 1602 James VI hammered silver Eight Thistle Merk, I shilling and eight pence (20 pence)

Obv - JACOBUS 6 D.G.R SCOTORUM

Rev - REGEM IOVA PROTEGIT 1602

1602 James VI of Scotland hammered silver Eighth Thistle Merk ( 20 pence)

Obv IACOBUS 6 D.G.R.SCOTORUM - James VI by the grace of god king of the Scots

Rev REGEM IOVA PROTEGIT 1602 - Jehovah protects the King 1602

1207 AD 'Rex' issue King John Irish one pence 1.24g, 17.26mm

This example is minted in Dublin and the Moneyer is Roberd

1209- 1216 John as King of ireland hammered silver penny- Rex coinage

Rev DIVE - Dublin mint Moneyer ROBERD

1247 Irish Henry III hammered silver voided penny

Irish 1216-1272 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Star by the head of Kings sceptre - Ref IH31D-015

Rev V/ION - Moneyer Davi of Dublin mint

1247 Irish Henry III hammered silver voided penny

Irish 1216-1272 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Irish 1279-1301 Edward 1st hammered silver penny - Trefoil of pellets on Kings breast, pellet at start of Obv legend

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUBL/INIE - Dublin mint

Irish 1276 Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUB/LINIE - Dublin mint

1279-1284 Irish Edward Ist hammered silver penny

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUB/LINE -City of Dublin

Scottish or Irish hammered silver penny ?? Rosettes by crown double satire stops both side of I

1279-1284 Irish Edward Ist hammered silver penny

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUB/LINE -City of Dublin

1279 Irish Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Trefoil of pellets on Kings breast

Irish 1279-1301 Edward 1st hammered silver penny - Trefoil of pellets on Kings breast, pellet at start of Obv legend

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUBL/INIE - Dublin mint

1279 - 84 Irish Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Rev CIV/TAS/WATE/RFOR - Waterford mint

1279 - 84 Irish Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Rev CIV/TAS/WATE/RFOR - Waterford mint

Irish 1279-1301 Edward 1st hammered silver penny - Trefoil of pellets on Kings breast,

Irish 1279-1301 Edward 1st hammered silver penny - single pellet on Kings breast, pellet at start of Obv legend

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUBL/INIE - Dublin mint

1279 - 84 Irish Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Rev CIV/TAS/WATE/RFOR - Waterford mint

Irish 1279-1301 Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUBL/INIE - Dublin mint

1472 -8 Irish Edward IV hammered silver long cross penny - Satires by neck - Quatrefoil in centre of reverse cross

Rev TAS/WAR - Warterford mint

Irish 1470-73 Edward IV hammered silver penny - double annulet stops - quadrefoil at centre of reverse cross - Unknown legend

Rev CIVI/TAS ***/AGIE - Cork mint

Amazing find - ex rare Irish 1496-1505 Henry VII hammered silver penny- Late portrait issue. Large rose to centre of reverse cross.

Rose as pellets in reverse cross and rose to left side of crown - unknown type

These are crudely made and no example exists with a legend as they are so poor

This example has a partial legend of hYB EZ or badly formed REX.

This a facinating Scottish hammered silver coin as it does not match any in the ref books. All of the James 1st to V reigns have a legend starting IACOBUS

The legend clearly reads MAR and the only match is Queen Mary 1542 - she issued long cross pennies with a crown in two angles and cinquefoil in other two angles.

This coin has 3 pellets in 3 angles and star in 4th quadrant

Could be an unknown issue - needs more research

1603-1604 Irish James 1st hammered silver sixpence - First coinage

Obv JACOBUS D.G. ANG SCO FRA ET HIB REX

1604-7 James 1st Irish hammered silver sixpence - 2nd issue

obv LACOBUS D.G.MAG BRIT FRA ET HI REX

1604 - 7 James 1st Irish hammered silver 6 pence - 2nd coinage

Rev TUEATUR UNITA DEUS - May god guard the Kingdom

Obv - IACOBUS D.D. ANG SCO FRA ET HIB REX -James by the grace of God King of England Scotland France and Ireland

1601- 4 James VI of Scotland hammered silver Eighth Thistle Merk ( 20 pence)

Obv IACOBUS 6 D.G.R.SCOTORUM - James VI by the grace of god king of the Scots

Rev REGEM IOVA PROTEGIT 1602 - Jehovah protects the King 1602

1603-25 James 1st Irish hammered silver shilling - 2nd issue - escallop mint mark


King Canute the Great

Canute or Cnut the Great was born circa 985 to 995 AD and was the son of King Sweyn Forkbeard. Canute’s reign and deeds were told of in Norse poetry, and was portrayed as a fierce Viking warrior in the Knýtlinga Saga, Canute was “exceptionally tall and strong, and the recognised of men, all except for his nose, that was thin, high set and rather hooked. He had a fair complexion nonetheless, and a fine thick head of hair. His eyes were better than those of other men, both the more handsome and keener of their sight.” Canute’s successes as a ruler and conqueror gave the Danes an important link to the maritime region of Britain and Ireland.

Canute supported his father’s campaign against King Ethelred II the Redeless, upon success Sweyn established himself on the English throne. Upon his father’s death in 1014, Ethelred returned to England and Canute was forced to flee to Denmark. Canute gathered his troops in Denmark and returned to England in 1015, managing to conquer nearly the entire country except for London. Upon the death of Ethelred II in 1016, the people of London chose his son Edmund Ironside as King, but the Witan elected Canute to replace the previous ineffectual king. The Witan was the term used to describe the council of Anglo-Saxon Kings they included aldermen, thanes and bishops to discuss royal grants of land, taxation, law, defence, foreign policy and church matters. This decision led Edmund and Canute into various skirmishes Canute defeated him at the Battle of Assandun, and this resulted in a treaty being drawn partitioning the country between the two men, the settlement would hold until the death of one the participants involved in which case all the lands would revert to the survivor. Edmund died only a month later On November 30, 1016, AD, and Canute became the King of England upon his coronation at Christmas in London. On the way to Rome for his coronation, Canute wrote a letter for his subjects, (this letter only exists in two-twelfth century Latin versions), proclaiming himself “King of all England and Denmark and the Norwegians and some of the Swedes.”

Silver penny of Canute the Great

During his early reign, Canute was a harsh leader and resorted to executions and exile to maintain his precarious position as King of the North Sea Empire. Canute engineered the murder of Edmund Ironside’s brother, chased Edmund’s children out of England and into safe Hungary and had many of his prominent English rivals killed. After a few years when his rule became more stable, he adopted a less harsh policy and allowed more Saxons into positions of power.

Considered a conciliatory gesture, Canute repudiated his wife Elgiva and married Ethelred’s widow, Emma of Normandy. Canute became King of Denmark in 1019 and King of Norway in 1028 making him the ruler of a massive empire surrounding the North Sea. Canute converted to Christianity and was an avid protector of the Church he promoted leaders of the English Church and was acknowledged by the Pope as the first Viking to becoming a Christian King. Embarking on a pilgrimage to Rome in 1027 Canute displayed reverence and humility and upon his return to England, he promised his Saxon subjects that he would rule with mercy and justice. Canute was remembered in medieval texts as a wise, successful and adept King, although this may have been due to his generous treatment of the Church who was the keepers of historical records at the time. He is portrayed as a religious and piteous man despite his sinful relationship with two wives and his harsh treatment of Christian opponents.

Administratively Canute was adept and divided England into four distinct areas for administrative purposes Wessex was the seat of government and directly ruled by himself, and East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria had viceroys appointed to govern the states. Edric Streona was named the Earl of Mercia but despite his new position he did feel he had been duly rewarded, and he argued with Canute. Edric proclaimed that without his desertion of Edmund Ironside Canute would not have been able to have won and claimed the throne. Canute replied that a man who betrayed one master was likely to do the same to another, and while arguing with the King, Edric was struck with a battle-axe by Eric of Northumbria and his head was placed on a spike on London Bridge.

Medieval impression depicting Edmund Ironside (left) and Canute (right).

There is a famous story proclaiming Canute’s vanity first recorded by Henry of Huntingdon in his twelfth-century Chronicle of the History of England, in which flattering courtiers convinced him he could hold back the tide of the ocean, the story is called Canute and the Waves. While history has remembered him as an almost humorous figure the medieval historian, Norman Cantor stated that Canute was “the most effective king in Anglo-Saxon history.” The size of his empire should be a stark reminder of his success as a conqueror and ruler.

Canute insisted that his Kingdom should continue to be ruled laid down by Edgar the Peaceful (he, himself made some additions) and this led to growth in his overall popularity and strengthened his control. After raids in Scotland, Malcolm II, King of Scots, recognised the Canute was an overlord and peace with Scotland was established for the remained of Canute’s reign.

Canute ruled England for nineteen years, and the protection he gave against Viking raiders (many of whom were under his command in the first place) helped to restore prosperity and the resources he commanded in England due to this influx helped him to establish secure control in Scandinavia as well.

The Anglo-Saxon King died on November 12, 1035, at Shaftsbury in Dorset and was buried in Winchester Cathedral, Canute’s illegitimate son Harold I seized the throne of England.

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Irish Coin Daily: Silver Penny of Anlaf Sithtricsson (Cuaran), Hiberno-Norse King of Northumbria (Circumscription Cross + trefoil of pellets) – Moneyer: Rathulf (of York)

Date: c. 950-952 AD Description: Hiberno-Norse (Kingdom of Northumbria). Anlaf Sithtricsson (Cuaran). Second reign, c. 950-952 Silver Penny. Circumscription Cross type, with trefoil of pellets on the obverse. York mint Moneyer: Rathulf. Extremely Fine (EF) Extremely rare References: S.1021 Obverse: Circumscription Cross, with trefoil of pellets in NE quadrant + ANLAF CUNUNCR (V as inverted&hellip


Silver Penny of King John - History

Project Britain

Your Guide to
British Life, Culture and Customs

Please note: We have mainly written about England, as that is the country within the UK where our students live. We would be very happy for schools and visitors to send us information we can add to our website on Wales and Scotland.

After the Norman Conquest in 1066, the pound was divided into twenty shillings or 240 pennies. It remained so until decimalization on 15 February 1971, when the pound was divided up as it is still done today.

Before 1971 money was divided into:

"I was born in 1943. The money used in our village was:- farthing, Ha'penny, penny, thrupenny bit, sixpence, shilling, two bob bit, half crown, ten bob note, pound note and five pound note. The crown coin was limited. I don't think there was a five pound coin. I believe the guinea was, still is, just a value and not a coin or note."
John Curd

Before decimalization on 15 February 1971, there were twenty (20) shillings per pound.

The shilling was subdivided into twelve (12) pennies.

The penny was further sub-divided into two halfpennies or four farthings (quarter pennies).

2 farthings = 1 halfpenny
2 halfpence = 1 penny (1d)
3 pence = 1 thruppence (3d)
6 pence = 1 sixpence (a 'tanner') (6d)
12 pence = 1 shilling (a bob) (1s)
2 shillings = 1 florin ( a 'two bob bit') (2s)
2 shillings and 6 pence = 1 half crown (2s 6d)
5 shillings = 1 Crown (5s)

The symbols 's' for shilling and 'd' for pence derive from the Latin solidus and denarius used in the Middle Ages.

The '£' sign developed from the 'l' for libra.

£ or l in some documents = pound s. or /- = shilling
d = penny (for 'denarius', a Roman silver coin)
g or gn = guinea

Can you work out how much
£4-8-4d (£4/8/4d) was?

A £1 coin was called a Sovereign and was made of gold.

A paper pound often was called a quid.

1 guinea and a £5.0.0 note

1 guinea = £1-1s-0d ( £1/1/- ) = one pound and one shilling = 21 shillings or 21/- (which is £1.05 in todays money)

1 guinea could be written as '1g' or '1gn'.

A guinea was considered a more gentlemanly amount than £1. You paid tradesmen, such as a carpenter, in pounds but gentlemen, such as an artist, in guineas.

A third of a guinea equalled exactly seven shillings.

Because the Guinea coast was fabled for its gold, and its name became attached to other things like guinea fowl, and New Guinea.

"A Guinea coin was available as legal tender and they were minted from gold. Therefore ceased to be used as such as they became collectors items, for the gold presumably. I was given 4 gold guinea coins when I was 13."
Manuel, Wilmslow, Cheshire

"Bob" is slang for shilling (which is 5p in todays money)

1 shilling equalled twelve pence (12d).

£1 (one pound) equalled 20 shillings (20s or 20/-)

240 pennies ( 240d ) = £1

There were 240 pennies to a pound because originally 240 silver penny coins weighed 1 pound (1lb).

A sum of £3 12s 6d was normally written as £3-12-6, but a sum of 12s 6d was normally recorded as 12/6.

Amounts less than a pound were also written as:

12/6 meaning 12s-6d

10/- meaning ten shillings.

An amount such as 12/6 would be pronounced 'twelve and six' as a more casual form of 'twelve shillings and sixpence'.

More than a Shilling (s. or /- )

Coins of more than one shilling ( 1/- ) but less than £1 in value were:

a florin (a two shillings or 2 bob or 2 bob bit) 10 x 2/- = £1
a half-crown ( 2/6d) (2 shillings and 6 pence) 8 x 2/6d = £1
a crown (5/-) (five shillings or 5 bob) 4 x 5/- = £1
a half-sovereign (ten shillings or 10 bob) 2 x 10/- = £1
a half-guinea (10/6d) (10 shillings and 6 pence) 2 x 10/6d = £1/1/-

Less than a Shilling (s. or /- )

Other coins of a value less than 1/- were 1/- (shilling) =
a half-groat (2d) 6 x 2d = 1/-
a threepenny bit (threepence) (3d) made of silver 4 x 3d. = 1/-
a groat (4d)
There were four pennies in a groat
3 x 4d = 1/-
a sixpence (silver) often called a 'tanner' 2 x 6d = 1/-
a penny (copper) often called a 'copper' 12 x 1d = 1/-

The word threepence would often be pronounced as though there was only a single middle "e", therefore "thre-pence". The slang name for the coin was Joey.

Penny coins were referred to as 'coppers'

We also used the words couple of coppers, tanner, bob, half-a-dollar, dollar, quid to mean the value or amount of the money needed, e.g. can you lend me ten bob please? It didn't really matter if in was made up of shillings and pennies, or any other coins.
John Curd

Less than a penny (d)

Pennies were broken down into other coins:

a farthing = ¼ of a penny (1/4d)
a halfpenny
(pronounced 'hay-p'ny')
= ½ of a penny (1/2d)

Farthing
Diameter : 20.0 mm Weight : 2.8 grams

Half Penny
Diameter : 25.0 mm Weight : 5.7 grams

Other names for coins

A shilling was often called a 'bob'.
"It cost me four bob."

Five shilling piece or crown was sometimes called a dollar

sixpence (silver) - often called a 'tanner'

A penny was often called a 'copper' after the metal it was minted from.

Old money conversions to money used today

  • Sixpence - 2½p
  • One shilling (or 'bob') - 5p
  • Half a crown (2 shillings and sixpence) - 12½p
  • One guinea - £1.05

4 pounds, eight shillings and fourpence

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Mandy is the creator of the Woodlands Resources section of the Woodlands Junior website.
The two websites projectbritain.com and primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk are the new homes for the Woodlands Resources.

Mandy left Woodlands in 2003 to work in Kent schools as an ICT Consulatant.
She now teaches computers at The Granville School and St. John's Primary School in Sevenoaks Kent.